What Are Words Worth?

Real estate writing, as any successful agent can anecdotally support, can have a profound impact on how quickly a property sells and at what price, but a series of fascinating studies recently spotlighted by the Wall Street Journal have added some statistical evidence to why good, effective and honest real estate writing can be so darn effective for selling property.

The Give and Take of Adjectives

The first of the studies is by Paul Anglin, an associate professor of real estate at the University of Guelph in Ontario who has been studying the nuances of real estate writing for some time. Certain adjectives and descriptions, Anglin has found, can make a big difference in a home’s chances on the market, but they can also result in trade-off situations. For example:

  • Using the word “beautiful” to describe a home will make it sell 15 percent faster, and increase the final sale price by 5 percent.
  • “Landscaping” is similarly influential, with a 20 percent faster sale time and 6 percent higher sale price.
  • “Handyman special,” by comparison, leads to a 50 percent faster sale time, but the final sale price plummets by 30 percent.
  • “Good value” has the same effect, with a 5 percent faster sale time but 5 percent lower sale price.
  • The one phrase to definitively avoid, though, is “motivated seller,” which adds 30 percent to the sale time and decreases the sale price by 8 percent.

Attributions in Real Estate Writing

Careful references to a home’s attributes can also positively benefit a home’s sale price and listing time. For instance, mentions of a home’s “granite,” “maple” or “gourmet” lead to a stronger selling price, according to research by the National Bureau of Economic Research; additionally, research by University of Texas at San Antonio Professor Thomas Thomson has found that mentioning “garage” increases sale price by 9.8 percent, and “fireplace” and “lake” increase it by 6.8 and 5.6 percent, respectively.

One thing both bodies of research found, though (and as we ourselves wrote not too long ago), was that hyperbole has no place in real estate writing. From “clean,” to “quiet,” to “fantastic” and “charming,” such words can seem not only superficial, but can, in the opinion of Thomson, create unfair expectations in prospective homebuyers that are inevitably crushed when they see the actual property.

“It’s like putting lipstick on a pig. If you put lipstick on a pig, it’s still a pig,” Thomson told the Journal.

- See more at: http://atlantaagentmagazine.com/whats-in-a-word-with-real-estate-writing-quite-a-bit/#sthash.9z8lO2xR.dpuf

Real estate writing, as any successful agent can anecdotally support, can have a profound impact on how quickly a property sells and at what price, but a series of fascinating studies recently spotlighted by the Wall Street Journal have added some statistical evidence to why good, effective and honest real estate writing can be so darn effective for selling property.

The Give and Take of Adjectives

The first of the studies is by Paul Anglin, an associate professor of real estate at the University of Guelph in Ontario who has been studying the nuances of real estate writing for some time. Certain adjectives and descriptions, Anglin has found, can make a big difference in a home’s chances on the market, but they can also result in trade-off situations. For example:

  • Using the word “beautiful” to describe a home will make it sell 15 percent faster, and increase the final sale price by 5 percent.
  • “Landscaping” is similarly influential, with a 20 percent faster sale time and 6 percent higher sale price.
  • “Handyman special,” by comparison, leads to a 50 percent faster sale time, but the final sale price plummets by 30 percent.
  • “Good value” has the same effect, with a 5 percent faster sale time but 5 percent lower sale price.
  • The one phrase to definitively avoid, though, is “motivated seller,” which adds 30 percent to the sale time and decreases the sale price by 8 percent.

Attributions in Real Estate Writing

Careful references to a home’s attributes can also positively benefit a home’s sale price and listing time. For instance, mentions of a home’s “granite,” “maple” or “gourmet” lead to a stronger selling price, according to research by the National Bureau of Economic Research; additionally, research by University of Texas at San Antonio Professor Thomas Thomson has found that mentioning “garage” increases sale price by 9.8 percent, and “fireplace” and “lake” increase it by 6.8 and 5.6 percent, respectively.

One thing both bodies of research found, though (and as we ourselves wrote not too long ago), was that hyperbole has no place in real estate writing. From “clean,” to “quiet,” to “fantastic” and “charming,” such words can seem not only superficial, but can, in the opinion of Thomson, create unfair expectations in prospective homebuyers that are inevitably crushed when they see the actual property.

“It’s like putting lipstick on a pig. If you put lipstick on a pig, it’s still a pig,” Thomson told the Journal.

- See more at: http://atlantaagentmagazine.com/whats-in-a-word-with-real-estate-writing-quite-a-bit/#sthash.9z8lO2xR.dpuf

Real estate writing, as any successful agent can anecdotally support, can have a profound impact on how quickly a property sells and at what price, but a series of fascinating studies recently spotlighted by the Wall Street Journal have added some statistical evidence to why good, effective and honest real estate writing can be so darn effective for selling property.

The Give and Take of Adjectives

The first of the studies is by Paul Anglin, an associate professor of real estate at the University of Guelph in Ontario who has been studying the nuances of real estate writing for some time. Certain adjectives and descriptions, Anglin has found, can make a big difference in a home’s chances on the market, but they can also result in trade-off situations. For example:

  • Using the word “beautiful” to describe a home will make it sell 15 percent faster, and increase the final sale price by 5 percent.
  • “Landscaping” is similarly influential, with a 20 percent faster sale time and 6 percent higher sale price.
  • “Handyman special,” by comparison, leads to a 50 percent faster sale time, but the final sale price plummets by 30 percent.
  • “Good value” has the same effect, with a 5 percent faster sale time but 5 percent lower sale price.
  • The one phrase to definitively avoid, though, is “motivated seller,” which adds 30 percent to the sale time and decreases the sale price by 8 percent.

Attributions in Real Estate Writing

Careful references to a home’s attributes can also positively benefit a home’s sale price and listing time. For instance, mentions of a home’s “granite,” “maple” or “gourmet” lead to a stronger selling price, according to research by the National Bureau of Economic Research; additionally, research by University of Texas at San Antonio Professor Thomas Thomson has found that mentioning “garage” increases sale price by 9.8 percent, and “fireplace” and “lake” increase it by 6.8 and 5.6 percent, respectively.

One thing both bodies of research found, though (and as we ourselves wrote not too long ago), was that hyperbole has no place in real estate writing. From “clean,” to “quiet,” to “fantastic” and “charming,” such words can seem not only superficial, but can, in the opinion of Thomson, create unfair expectations in prospective homebuyers that are inevitably crushed when they see the actual property.

“It’s like putting lipstick on a pig. If you put lipstick on a pig, it’s still a pig,” Thomson told the Journal.

- See more at: http://atlantaagentmagazine.com/whats-in-a-word-with-real-estate-writing-quite-a-bit/#sthash.9z8lO2xR.dpuf

Real estate writing, as any successful agent can anecdotally support, can have a profound impact on how quickly a property sells and at what price, but a series of fascinating studies recently spotlighted by the Wall Street Journal have added some statistical evidence to why good, effective and honest real estate writing can be so darn effective for selling property.

The Give and Take of Adjectives

The first of the studies is by Paul Anglin, an associate professor of real estate at the University of Guelph in Ontario who has been studying the nuances of real estate writing for some time. Certain adjectives and descriptions, Anglin has found, can make a big difference in a home’s chances on the market, but they can also result in trade-off situations. For example:

  • Using the word “beautiful” to describe a home will make it sell 15 percent faster, and increase the final sale price by 5 percent.
  • “Landscaping” is similarly influential, with a 20 percent faster sale time and 6 percent higher sale price.
  • “Handyman special,” by comparison, leads to a 50 percent faster sale time, but the final sale price plummets by 30 percent.
  • “Good value” has the same effect, with a 5 percent faster sale time but 5 percent lower sale price.
  • The one phrase to definitively avoid, though, is “motivated seller,” which adds 30 percent to the sale time and decreases the sale price by 8 percent.

Attributions in Real Estate Writing

Careful references to a home’s attributes can also positively benefit a home’s sale price and listing time. For instance, mentions of a home’s “granite,” “maple” or “gourmet” lead to a stronger selling price, according to research by the National Bureau of Economic Research; additionally, research by University of Texas at San Antonio Professor Thomas Thomson has found that mentioning “garage” increases sale price by 9.8 percent, and “fireplace” and “lake” increase it by 6.8 and 5.6 percent, respectively.

One thing both bodies of research found, though (and as we ourselves wrote not too long ago), was that hyperbole has no place in real estate writing. From “clean,” to “quiet,” to “fantastic” and “charming,” such words can seem not only superficial, but can, in the opinion of Thomson, create unfair expectations in prospective homebuyers that are inevitably crushed when they see the actual property.

“It’s like putting lipstick on a pig. If you put lipstick on a pig, it’s still a pig,” Thomson told the Journal.

- See more at: http://atlantaagentmagazine.com/whats-in-a-word-with-real-estate-writing-quite-a-bit/#sthash.9z8lO2xR.dpuf

Real estate writing, as any successful agent can anecdotally support, can have a profound impact on how quickly a property sells and at what price, but a series of fascinating studies recently spotlighted by the Wall Street Journal have added some statistical evidence to why good, effective and honest real estate writing can be so darn effective for selling property.

The Give and Take of Adjectives

The first of the studies is by Paul Anglin, an associate professor of real estate at the University of Guelph in Ontario who has been studying the nuances of real estate writing for some time. Certain adjectives and descriptions, Anglin has found, can make a big difference in a home’s chances on the market, but they can also result in trade-off situations. For example:

  • Using the word “beautiful” to describe a home will make it sell 15 percent faster, and increase the final sale price by 5 percent.
  • “Landscaping” is similarly influential, with a 20 percent faster sale time and 6 percent higher sale price.
  • “Handyman special,” by comparison, leads to a 50 percent faster sale time, but the final sale price plummets by 30 percent.
  • “Good value” has the same effect, with a 5 percent faster sale time but 5 percent lower sale price.
  • The one phrase to definitively avoid, though, is “motivated seller,” which adds 30 percent to the sale time and decreases the sale price by 8 percent.

Attributions in Real Estate Writing

Careful references to a home’s attributes can also positively benefit a home’s sale price and listing time. For instance, mentions of a home’s “granite,” “maple” or “gourmet” lead to a stronger selling price, according to research by the National Bureau of Economic Research; additionally, research by University of Texas at San Antonio Professor Thomas Thomson has found that mentioning “garage” increases sale price by 9.8 percent, and “fireplace” and “lake” increase it by 6.8 and 5.6 percent, respectively.

One thing both bodies of research found, though (and as we ourselves wrote not too long ago), was that hyperbole has no place in real estate writing. From “clean,” to “quiet,” to “fantastic” and “charming,” such words can seem not only superficial, but can, in the opinion of Thomson, create unfair expectations in prospective homebuyers that are inevitably crushed when they see the actual property.

“It’s like putting lipstick on a pig. If you put lipstick on a pig, it’s still a pig,” Thomson told the Journal.

- See more at: http://atlantaagentmagazine.com/whats-in-a-word-with-real-estate-writing-quite-a-bit/#sthash.9z8lO2xR.dpuf

In Real Estate Writing — Plenty.

Property descriptions can have a huge influence on how fast your property sells and at what price.

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So, which of these two words packs more punch? If you picked beautiful, you are right. Studies prove that the word "beautiful" can reduce your on-the-market time by 15% and add 5% to your ultimate sale price, that's an additional $12,500 for a $250,000 home. However, the term "Charming," or similar words are ambiguous terms which appear to be real estate agent code for a property that doesn’t have many specific strong points worth mentioning. 

Descriptive words that are physical descriptions of the house work well. For example, even if you don’t like the word 'granite’, the term doesn’t give the impression that the house is in poor repair.

My job is to market your property as well as possible. The choice of words and how they are expressed is crucial because it can focus prospective buyers on the positive attributes of the property.

Combine the right words in the listing description with our professional photography and that will get prospective buyers, and their agents, in the car and on their way to see for themselves. When this happens we've hit both our targets and, more-than-likely, their agent has more than one buyer looking for a home just like yours and a chance for multiple offers.

Want to get the best price possible for your property?

Fill out this simple form. I'll contact you within 24-hours. If you can't wait that long, call me, (402) 639-8558 and I'll get your property marketed the way it should be.

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Here Is An Example of a Winning Description.

"Just blocks from Zorinsky Lake, this exquisite home feels like a Palm Springs resort. Fabulous layout with all the “right” spaces. Entertain beneath soaring ceilings in a grand formal rooms. cook for 2-20 in the perfectly-designed kitchen. Relax in the family room, rec room or fireside study. Sumptuous master suite includes a private balcony. Lakeview rooftop deck, sunny west-facing main deck, patio and a lavishly landscaped yard."

Our Photo Gallery. Click thumbnail images, below, to enlarge.

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Team Hardy, Omaha Home Photography Offer NP Dodge Photo Services

We have an exclusive contract with Omaha Home Photography to photograph all Omaha, Nebraska area listings.
Photos © Omaha Home Photography.

About John

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From establishing a sale price to creating a marketing campaign that reaches all the syndicated services, social media and traditional web. I have an exclusive strategy that will put your property in the willing hands of the most qualified buyers at the best price. 

John Hardy, NP Dodge

GTH_RoundTrulia.pngI won Trulia's Top-Agent Award in 2014. This put me among Nebraska's Top 1% of Listing Agents. I attribute this to 25-years of advertising, marketing and proven strategy. Combined, those attributes get your property in front of more eyes than any other agent in Omaha.